Multidisciplinarity at the Copenhagen Bioscience Conference - Protein Signaling – University of Copenhagen

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14 October 2016

Multidisciplinarity at the Copenhagen Bioscience Conference - Protein Signaling

In the first week of October 170 participants from 24 different countries came to Favrholm just north of Copenhagen to participate in the Copenhagen Bioscience Conference – from Pathways to Networks.  

The conference was hosted by CPR in collaboration with the Novo Nordisk Foundation and had the aim of providing an scientific conference in an extraordinary setting where alternative meeting formats were put in place to make the perfect environment for learning, networking, discussing, interacting and sharing knowledge from the protein signaling research area:

  • DNA damage signaling
  • Cell cycle
  • Disease pathways
  • Signaling systems network  
  • Emerging technologies
  • Ubiquitin-modifiers

Knowledge sharing took place at 'all levels' and in different group settings which has helped facilitate multidisciplinary discussions and innovative ways of interacting. The participants were interacting with eachother at plenary sessions, in round table discussions, at poster sessions, at the social event and in the so-called PI Pub where senior scientific names where hosting informal discussion groups on specific subjects.

Read the full reportage from the conference Unravelling the big picture in smaller groups and check out the gallery of photos from the conference.

The participants said (from NNF news reportage; Unravelling the big picture in smaller groups):

“It was really good for interactions. Everybody had an opportunity to present themselves and talk about their research and their own experiences. I work on a specific aspect of the cell cycle, and we had a very wide-ranging discussion. I definitely felt at ease talking about what I feel are the challenges of the field,” said Lucia Chemes.

“Science has been superb. Networking opportunities have been fabulous. I have already started multiple collaborations in two days. New projects in fact. I have had projects that were lingering in my lab, and I didn’t really know in which direction to take one thing in, and after hearing a talk yesterday I spoke to the speaker and we are going to be exchanging reagents and I think we are both going to do totally different work because of this, so I am very excited about that. I think everybody is relaxed and telling each other results. People feel free to interact in such a setting, and I think that is another reason to come here,” said Brenda Schulman.